IMG_00872'

Tiphaine Jeanniard du Dot

Alumni
PhD 2015

Tel: 604.822.9150
Fax: 604.822.8189
E-mail: dudot@zoology.ubc.ca

Supervisors: Dr. Andrew Trites, Dr Christophe Guinet

Education:
MSc – Zoology (University of British Columbia, Canada)
DEA – Toxicologie Environnementale (Université Paris 5, France)
Maitrise – Biologie des Populations et Écosystèmes (Université Bordeaux 1, France)
Licence – Biologie des Organismes (Université Bordeaux 1, France)
DEUG – Sciences de la Vie et de la Terre (Université de Tours, France)

Research Interests: I am interested in understanding how environmental changes such as prey availability, water temperature, oceanic currents, affect fitness, survival and reproduction of marine mammals, from a bioenergetic perspective. My research focuses on how animals adjust their physiology and behaviours to changes in their environment and how different energetic strategies affect survival and reproduction. Finally, I am interested in extending the use of bioenergetic models and integrating environmental data to predict changes in life history traits and ultimately population dynamics of marine top predators for a conservation purpose.

Research Area: Pribilof Islands (Bering Sea), Kerguelen Archipelago (Sub-Antarctic)


Current Project:

Effects of environmental changes on fitness and foraging efficiency of fur seals: an energetic approach

Northern fur seals

Northern fur seals

Understanding the extent to which organisms are able to adjust to environment variability is essential to understand how abiotic and biotic factors are linked in an ecosystem and to predict the impacts of future climate change on individuals and populations. In this context, the flexibility of animals in their energy acquisition and expenditure is key because energy is the building block for survival and reproduction. My research evaluates the energetic and behavioural flexibility of marine top predators through adjustments of foraging strategies in response to environmental variability. I compare energetic requirements, foraging behaviours and efficiencies, and energetic allocation between different physiological functions (reproduction, self-maintenance, growth) of two closely-related species of fur seals, northern fur seals in the Bering Sea and Antarctic fur seals in the Sub-Antarctic region. These two species have similar morphology, foraging ecology and maternal strategy, but display different population trajectories, which make them ideal candidates for comparative studies.

x

Antarctic fur seals

More precisely, I am interested in determining the energy requirements of the two species of fur seals and the energy allocation between different physiological functions of the animals; in assessing the difference in foraging behaviors and foraging efficiencies between the two species using telemetry devices and activity-specific field metabolic rate measurements; and finally, in linking foraging strategies and efficiencies with environmental parameters on one hand, and with demographic parameters on the other hand into a dynamic energy budget model. I believe in integrative and interdisciplinary projects to extract the most valuable information on the mechanistics of responses of top predators to changes in their habitats. The ultimate goal is to estimate potential repercussion of environmental changes on populations in a conservation perspective.


Publications

  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Trites A.W. Energy requirements of Northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) individuals and population. In Prep.
  • Trites, A.W. Jeanniard du Dot T. Insights into the life of northern fur seals from captive studies. In Prep.
  • Richmond J.P., Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen D.A.S., Zinn S.A. 2010 Seasonal influence on the response of the somatotropic axis to nutrient restriction and re-alimentation in captive Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). Journal of Experimental Zoology [A] 313: 144-156
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen, D.A., and Trites A.W. 2009 Energy re-allocation during and after periods of nutritional stress in Steller sea lions: low-quality diet reduces capacity for physiological adjustments. Journal of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology. 39(4):284-306
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen D.A., Richmond, J.P., Kitaysky A.S. and Trites A.W. 2009 Changes in blood metabolites and hormones do not reflect nutritional status of Steller sea lions during and after periods of nutritional stress. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology [A]152(4):524-534
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen, D.A. and Trites A.W. 2008. Steller sea lions show diet-dependant changes in body composition during nutritional stress and recover more easily from mass loss in winter. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 367:1-10
  • Richmond J.P., Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen D.A.S., Zinn S.A. 2006 Effect of prey composition on the endocrine response to nutrient restriction and re-alimentation in Steller sea lions (Eumetopia jubatus). Proceedings of the Comparative Nutrition Society; p136-141.

Presentations

  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Trites, A.W., Arnould J.P.Y, Guinet, C., 2013. Cost-benefit ratios of foraging trips for northern and Antarctic fur seals. Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals, Dunedin, New-Zealand
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., 2013. Les mammiferes marins, sentinelles des ecosystemes. Printemps des Sciences – Carrefour des Humanites. Lorient, France. Invited Speaker.
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Trites, A.W., Arnould J.P.Y, Guinet, C., 2013. Is Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration (ODBA) a good predictor of the energy expended by northern fur seals while foraging? Marine Science Symposium. Anchorage, Alaska
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Trites, A.W., 2009. Asynchronous seasonal growth and energy requirements of northern fur seals. Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals, Québec, Canada
  • Jeanniard du Dot, T., Rosen D.A.S, Trites, A.W. 2007. Is pollock really junk food? Insights on the effects of diet and season on the physiology of Steller sea lion. NWSSMM, Seattle WA.
  • Jeanniard du Dot, T., Rosen D.A.S, Trites, A.W. 2006 Energetic priorities of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) during and after a nutritional stress: Effect of the diet. Canadian Society of Zoologists. Edmonton, AB.
  • Jeanniard du Dot T., Rosen, D.S., Trites, A.W., 2005. Steller sea lions energetic priorities during and after a nutritional stress: are proteins the key? Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals, San Diego, CA
  • Giguère, A., Campbell, P., Jeanniard Du Dot, T., Hare, L. 2001. Metal partitioning at the organ and subcellular levels in indigenous yellow perch.Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 22d Annual Meeting Baltimore, USA

Other symposia

Society for Marine Mammalogy NW Chapter Symposium: Vancouver, Apr. 2008

British Columbia Marine Mammal Symposium Vancouver, Nov. 2006

Society for Marine Mammalogy NW Chapter Symposium Bellingham, Apr. 2006

UBC Zoology Symposium Vancouver, Apr. 2006

British Columbia Marine Mammal Symposium Vancouver, Nov. 2005

Society for Marine Mammalogy NW Chapter Symposium Vancouver Apr. 2005

UBC Zoology Symposium Vancouver, Apr. 2005

Workshops

Dynamic Energy Budget Theory.4-15 Apr 2011. Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Led by Bas Kooijman from the VU University of Amsterdam, The            Netherlands

Bayesian state-space models for population ecology and animal movement data.10-13 Oct 2010. Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé at the Centre                       National de la Recherche Scientifique (France). Led by Ian Jonsen from the Dalhousie University, Canada

 

I appreciate the help and support provided by: